Archive for the ‘Lectures’ Category.

17th Annual GRCC Diversity Lecture Series Announced

For 17 years, Grand Rapids Community College has been bringing thoughtful and provocative speakers to address our community at the Diversity Lecture Series.  GRCC has just announced the speakers for the 2011-2012 academic year and once again the list is impressive. The speakers in the 17th Diversity Lecture Series include:

  • Nicholas D. Kristof – September 26, 2011   “Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women”

Nicholas Kristof, is the author of Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women, which outlines an agenda for the world’s women and three major abuses: sex trafficking and forced prostitution; gender-based violence including honor killings and mass rape; and maternal mortality, which needlessly claims one woman a minute. Kristof, a two-time Pulitzer Prize winner and columnist for The New York Times since 2001, is widely known for bringing to light human rights abuses in Asia and Africa. Many reviewers suggest that Half the Sky stands to become a classic, igniting a grass-roots revolution.

  • Jeannette Walls – October 26, 2011  “The Glass Castle: Demon Hunting and Other Life Lessons”

Jeannette Walls is author of the memoir, The Glass Castle, which has been on the New York Times best-sellers list for over three years. The book details Walls’ life growing up in extreme poverty and describes the unimaginable obstacles she faced. From the desert of the Southwest to her parent’s later homelessness in New York City, Walls’ account of an impoverished life is a compelling testament to what it means to be poor. Jeannette Walls is also a journalist whose work has appeared in New York Magazine, Esquire, USA Today, and MSNBC.

  • Maziar Bahari – November 9, 2011  “Then They Came for Me: A Family’s Story of Love, Captivity, and Survival”

Maziar Bahari, Iranian-Canadian journalist was arrested in Tehran on trumped-up charges of espionage in the aftermath of the contested 2009 election. Held in solitary confinement for 118 days, enduring physical and psychological torture, he chronicles his story in, Then They Came for Me: A Family’s Story of Love, Captivity, and Survival. As a correspondent for Newsweek, Bahari is an expert on Iran yet also embraces a wide range of subjects as a filmmaker, from Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany, to Iraqi child prisoners and Aids in South Africa.

  •  Jeff Johnson – February 15, 2012  “Everything I’m Not Made Me Everything I Am”

 Jeff Johnson is renowned both for his conversations with world figures in the political, business and entertainment arenas and his grass-roots work seeking to inspire the next generation of leaders. Johnson is a trailblazing social entrepreneur and authentic voice for change. Sometimes called the “conscience voice” of BET Networks, Johnson looks for ways to merge the worlds of politics and popular culture, through broad-based communication, including as a contributor to the Tom Joyner Morning Show. He is the author of Everything I’m Not Made Me Everything I Am.

  • Naomi Wolf – March 14, 2012   “Beyond Victimization: The Beauty Myth Revisited”

Author of seven books, including the New York Times best seller The Beauty Myth, Naomi Wolf focuses on gender equality, pervasive inequities in society and politics, the defense of liberty in America and internationally, and body image. She is the cofounder of the Woodhull Institute for Ethical Leadership, which teaches ethics and empowerment to young women leaders. In Give Me Liberty: A Handbook for American Revolutionaries, Wolf argues that breathtaking changes take place when ordinary citizens engage in the democratic system the way the founders intended, through civic engagement.

Warner Norcross & Judd has been a proud sponsor of the Diversity Lecture Series for a number of years.  For more information about the Diversity Lecture Series, visit the website of the GRCC Diversity Learning Center (click here).

Eric Alva to Speak at 15th Annual Diversity Lecture Series

eric_alvaThe 2009-2010 Diversity Lecture Series at Grand Rapids Community College begins this week, with a lecture on Wednesday night by Eric Alva. Alva is a former Marine who was injured at the start of Operation Iraqi Freedom. He was the first American to be wounded in the war and the first to receive the Purple Heart.

Today, Alva works with the Human Rights Campaign to challenge the military’s Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy. He will be speaking on that topic, this Wednesday, October 14, at 7:00 p.m. at Fountain Street Church, 24 Fountain NE, in Grand Rapids. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Warner Norcross & Judd is a continuing sponsor of the Diversity Lectures Series, which is hosted by the Bob and Aleicia Diversity Learning Center at Grand Rapids Community College. As a sponsor, we have several tickets to attend a reception for Mr. Alva at 6:00 p.m., immediately prior to the lecture. If you would like to attend the reception, contact Rodney Martin.

• Martin Luther King Day Events at GRCC Feature Juan Williams

Warner Norcross & Judd will once again be participating in programs at Grand Rapids Community College to honor the memory of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., on Martin Luther King Day, January 19, 2009.

From 12:30 to 1:30 p.m., GRCC and the Kent Intermediate School District holds a Community Peace Program at the Gerald R. Ford Fieldhouse.  At this Program, the winner of Warner Norcross & Judd’s Martin Luther King, Jr., Essay Contest will read his or her essay and the other winners will be recognized.  This program is principally for students in the Kent Intermediate School District, but members of the community are welcome to attend.  Students from GRCC and the KISD will be performing.  The program is preceded at noon by a Community Peace March that forms at the Fieldhouse.

Juan WilliamsFrom 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., GRCC and Grand Valley University will host the annual Community Celebration Program at the Gerald R. Ford Fieldhouse.  The celebration will feature a keynote address by Juan Williams, senior correspondent at NPR, a political analyst for FOX News, and the author of Enough-The Phony Leaders, Dead-End Movements and Culture of Failure That Are Undermining Black America- and What We Can Do About It.

The winners of Warner Norcross & Judd’s Martin Luther King, Jr., Essay Contest will again be recognized during the Community Celebration Program.  

• Amy Dickinson to Speak at GRCC Diversity Lecture Series

Amy DickinsonAmy Dickinson will be speaking on “Aging in the 21st Century” at the Grand Rapids Community College Diversity Lecture Series on Wednesday, November 12 at 7:00 p.m. at Fountain Street Church, 24 Fountain NE, in Grand Rapids.   Dickinson’s “Ask Amy” column in the Chicago Tribune is syndicated in over 200 newspapers nationwide. She is a regular panelist on Wait, Wait Don’t Tell Me, carried on 400 NPR stations, and has been featured on NPR’s All Things Considered.

Dickenson’s work focuses on family life and parenting, often drawing from her experiences as a single parent and member of a large extended family. Dickinson is a distant relative of Emily Dickinson; her family has lived in her hometown of Finger Lakes, New York continuously since the revolutionary war. “Life in my hometown was like growing up in Lake Wobegon, only with worse weather and high unemployment.” She continues, “My great grandfather was warden of Sing Sing prison and my great uncle ran off to Europe and joined the circus when he was 40.”

Warner Norcross & Judd is proud to be a continuing sponsor of the Diversity Lectures Series, which is  hosted by the Bob and Aleicia Diversity Learning Center at Grand Rapids Community College.  As a sponsor, we have several tickets to attend a reception for Ms. Dickinson prior to the lecture.  If you would like to attend, contact Rodney Martin.

• Speakers Announced for the 14th GRCC Diversity Lecture Series

Warner Norcross & Judd is proud to be a continuing sponsor of the Diversity Lectures Series hosted by the Bob and Aleicia Diversity Learning Center at Grand Rapids Community College.  Each year, the Diversity Learning Center brings outstanding speakers to advance the discussion of diversity and inclusion in our community.  This coming school year is no exception.  The Diversity Learning Center has lined up an extraordinary group of lecturers for the fourteenth annual lecture series during the coming school year.  Here, from the series brochure which you can download here, is a list of the speakers:

Ray Suarez – October 8, 2008
Journalist, Author, Correspondent
“Media, Politics and Washington: An Evening with Ray Suarez”Ray Suarez

With more than twenty-five years of varied experience in journalism, Ray Suarez, one of the most respected news anchors in Washington today, continues to make major contributions to the public understanding of the stories shaping America today. Ray Suarez is the Senior Correspondent for PBS’s News Hour with Jim Lehrer and was previously host of NPR’s nationwide call-in news show Talk of the Nation. Suarez thinks that the media is the best tool by which people can voice their opinions about those who govern. On top of his work on the public airwaves; Suarez has taken to chronicling the American condition on the page. His much talked-about new book, The Holy Vote: The Politics of Faith in America, takes an in-depth look at the intersection of politics and religion in this country, while also examining the increasing polarization between Red and Blue States.

Amy Dickinson – November 12,, 2008
Author, Syndicated Columnist, NPR Commentator
“Aging in the 21st Century”

Amy DickinsonAmy Dickinson’s voice and narratives are heard and seen in numerous mediums. As a columnist her Ask Amy column for the Chicago Tribune is syndicated in over 200 newspapers nationwide. She is a regular panelist on Wait, Wait Don’t Tell Me, carried on 400 NPR stations, and has been featured on NPR’s All Things Considered. Her work focuses on family life and parenting, often drawing from her experiences as a single parent and member of a large extended family. Dickinson is a distant relative of Emily Dickinson; her family has lived in her hometown of Finger Lakes, New York continuously since the revolutionary war. “Life in my hometown was like growing up in Lake Wobegon, only with worse weather and high unemployment.” She continues, “My great grandfather was warden of Sing Sing prison and my great uncle ran off to Europe and joined the circus when he was 40.”

B. D. Wong – December 3, 2008
Tony Award-Winning Actor, Author, Activist
“Racial Self-image and the Model Minority Myth”
B. D. Wong

While perhaps best known to many as forensic psychiatrist Dr. George Huang on NBC’s Law and Order: Special Victims Unit, B.D. Wong is also an author, Broadway actor, and accomplished speaker. Wong feels that living day to day in the trenches of his challenging career as an actor, (a vocation in an industry fraught with rejection and racism) has forced him to not only empower himself and his own self esteem, but it has caused him to be even more facile and articulate about the issues of racial self-image, race-based rejection, Asian-American parental pressure, and the “model minority myth.” In June 2003, Wong released his first book, Following Foo: The Electronic Adventures of the Chestnut Man, a memoir about the personal drama that he and his partner endured on their path to parenthood “involving a surrogate, an egg from his partner’s sister and identical twins born 13 weeks prematurely and needing months of intensive care.”

Prince Cedza Dlamini – February 4, 2009
Humanitarian, Social Entrepreneur
“Global Forgiveness and Connectedness”

Prince Cedza DlaminiCedza Dlamini is an impassioned humanitarian, social entrepreneur and visionary.  His vision is to create a unified global order by establishing global networks of young leaders working collectively to address world problems, such as HIV/AIDS, poverty, hunger, and illiteracy.  He travels the world to help young people recognize their connectedness to each other and their power to change their surroundings.  As the grandson of Nelson Mandela, he carries on the activism and investment in community leading him to expose young people to the leadership and professional skills they need in their communities.  He founded the Ubuntu Institute for Young Social Entrepreneurs, to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, the United Nation’s eight point strategy to eradicate poverty, hunger and disease in Africa.

Shannon Brownlee – March 11, 2009
Author, Economist, Health Care Analyst
“Debunking The Myth of Poor Care for American Veterans”

Shannon BrownleeShannon Brownlee is a Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation, and a former writer for U.S. News and Word Report.  The New York Times named her best-seller Overtreated: Why Too Much Medicine is Making Us Sicker and Poorer as the #1 Economics Book of the Year. Shannon Brownlee examines the unprecedented influence that “fee-for-service” care is having on America’s public health-and sets myth from reality in examining the successes and failures in our ever-changing health systems. As debate surrounds the availability and quality of care for American soldiers and veterans, Shannon shares the story of the Veterans Health Administration-which has gone from a picture of all that was wrong with American health care, to a symbol of all that can be right. Bucking the traditional systems, the VHA is working with providers and veterans to create collaboration towards a more efficient and effective model.

All lectures begin at 7:00 p.m. at Fountain Street Church, 24 Fountain NE, in Grand Rapids. 

• Lunch and Learn: Raising Culturally Competent Children – RSVP Information

Melita Travis JohnsonFor most of people, the workplace is the only place they regularly have contact with people from other ethnic groups.  Our neighborhoods, religious institutions and clubs tend not to reflect the rich cultural diversity of our state.  This raises the issue of how we as parents and grandparents can raise children who will be able to thrive in our multicultural world?

We have invited Melita Travis-Johnson, a social worker with Encompass, to join us at noon on Monday, July 28, to address that question in a talk called “Raising Culturally Competent Children.”  The talk will take place at a Lunch-and-Learn session at the University Club and will be streamed over the Internet to our other offices. 

Please RSVP to this luncheon presentation to Robin Keith by Monday, July 21.